Interview with Jacob Beckley from CURE Token

Horacio sat down with Jacob Beckley, founder of CURE Token and the Beckley Foundation. Jacob created CURE Token, a cryptocurrency, in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic amid a steep decline in charitable donations. Since then, Jacob has found greater utility for the coin and hopes to integrate into a new blockchain that can potentially revolutionize healthcare.

Discussion topics include:

  • Establishing the Beckley Foundation for pediatric cancer research
  • Raising money by climbing mountains, rowing across Lake Michigan, and hosting fundraising events
  • Creating CURE Token in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Other charitable crypto projects that turned out to be scams
  • Developing CURE Pay to make the introduction to cryptocurrencies much easier
  • The tokenomics of CURE Token to make it as efficient as possible
  • The flaw with other foundations only giving a small percentage of donations to the areas of need
  • Partnering with grassroots foundations to keep them in operation through CURE Token
  • Supporting children and families all over the world
  • Using blockchain technology through CURE Chain as a way to speed up pediatric cancer research by connecting researchers across the world through crypto
  • Sponsoring the NASCAR race team Kaulig Racing and driver Noah Gragson for one race

You can listen to the podcast through Spotify or YouTube.


[Horacio Ruiz]

Welcome back to the Alts podcast. I’m your host Horacio Ruiz. We bring you industry leaders and creators to give their insights on the rapidly changing and exciting world of alternative assets. Opinions expressed on this podcast by the host and podcast guests are for informational purposes only and should not be considered investment advice. Podcast hosts and guests may maintain positions in the offerings discussed in this podcast. Today’s guest is Jacob Beckley, founder of CURE Token, and the Beckley Foundation. With the CURE Token, Jacob’s mission is to fund paediatric cancer research and to help families with the oftentimes crushing financial burden of medical costs. But Jacob’s mission goes beyond philanthropy. It also involves a project currently in development to create a blockchain that will revolutionise medical research. I hope you enjoy this conversation with Jacob. So, Jacob, thank you so much. I’m glad we’re finally able to speak. I know you’ve been through quite a whirlwind the last couple weeks, big news. So just thanks for joining me tonight.

[Jacob Beckley]

Thanks for having me. Yeah. There’s been a lot that’s happened over the past week and seems like every week it’s something new.

[Horacio Ruiz]

Yeah. We talked maybe about two weeks ago, just to kind of get to know each other a little bit better. And I mean, some of the stuff that you were saying in the short time you were able to speak was pretty thought provoking. And I knew you had some things down the pipeline and here it is coming to fruition. So where do we begin? Right. Cuz there’s so many things. Your story is pretty unique or really interesting. Really. I want to start here. You had a foundation, the Beckley Foundation. And you’re a philanthropist, right? You’ve you created this foundation for paediatric cancer patients. And I’ll kind of let you take that off. What was the Genesis for creating your Beckley Foundation? 

[Jacob Beckley]

Yeah, absolutely. So, the foundation was founded in 2016, as a 501C3 non-profit organization in the US. But I’ve actually started raising money for paediatric cancer many years before. I think the first thing that I had ever done was in 2011 or 2012. And I was attracted to the idea of raising money for paediatric cancer because I had met a researcher that was just so passionate about this work. And I mean, she was a surgeon during the day, and like working very long hours. And all of her free time was dedicated to paediatric cancer research. And that moved me. And at the same time, I met a lot of families along that way. And I think the families is what convinced me that this is where I need to dedicate my life. So, I dedicated my life to a life of service many years ago. And the families I’ve met are families that have either lost their children to childhood cancer or were still suffering through it. And I became friends with these people. I mean, you work alongside then, you kind of understand their challenges and what they’re going through and inevitably you sympathise and want to help them in any way you can. So, I guess at that point in 2012, I had met the first families. And then I guess since that point until the current time, I mean, it’s been hundreds of families that we’ve met and become friends with and supported in a variety of different ways, whether it’s just helping them connect with additional resources or helping them financially. The sad truth of it is, is that when a family is diagnosed with a child with cancer, more times than not, it’s almost guarantee that that family is going to have financial burdens and potentially have to claim bankruptcy. And it’s a struggle that I feel is not necessary. And the reason as well, that I chose paediatric cancer or research as my calling, is because I’ve worked a day job in innovation. And my job is about trying to find breakthroughs, new ideas, new concepts, new ways of doing things. And I truly believe that cancer as a whole, whether it’s childhood or adulthood, the solve for that, for that problem is going to come out of paediatric cancer research. It’s at the inception, it’s when it’s at the youngest stages, the youngest phases of cancer. So, I believe by focusing on the most aggressive forms of paediatric cancer, I think we’re going to have breakthroughs that already will cascade throughout all forms of cancer. And it already has to this day. 

[Horacio Ruiz]

Yeah. So, you told me you had the surgeon, and she dedicated all her time there. And you’ve been involved since 2011, 2012. So, you started your foundation 2016. What have you been able to do in that time? Cause I know you’ve done – you’ve been in the news before other things, there’s a legitimacy here that comes with what you do with your foundation. Right. And you’ve been very transparent about it. Could you list a few things? Like what are some events that you do, how much money have you raised? And I know you’ve been involved with something even rowing across lake Michigan, right?

[Jacob Beckley]

Yeah, exactly. Yeah. So, in, I think 2015, I did a campaign which was called Summit For a CURE. Which I picked one of the tallest mountains in north America and wanted to climb. And I think at that point, I raised probably like $3,000. It was nothing significant. But it meant a lot to me that I was putting myself out there. In my day job, I’m a developer, a technologist and I sit behind a computer all day. I’m not athletic at all. And I wanted to put myself out there and challenge myself, both physically and mentally. So, I trained for a very long period of time to get myself into shape, to do it. And then, and then did it. And then in 2016 I woke up in the middle of the night thinking I got to do something, something else this year, every year I wanted to do something new that really pushes me. And I woke up in the middle of the night with crazy idea that, just like, I wonder if anyone’s ever rode across lake Michigan. And for anyone who doesn’t know what lake Michigan is, it’s a very large body of water that connects Michigan with Illinois. Specifically, Chicago is where I went into. So, I spent the whole night researching it, Googling it. I didn’t know what rowing was. I didn’t know what the distance was. I didn’t even know if it was possible. But I found out that it hadn’t been done yet. So, I started looking into what kind of boat I would need to purchase, how this would occur, how long it would take, what is rowing because I had no idea what rowing was. And from that, I discovered pretty quickly that there wasn’t a boat that would work for this type of journey. They make row boats, and they make rowing boats. But rowing boats are traditionally for like smooth bodies of water, rivers, things like that. So, I actually had to build a boat from scratch and spent the next six months building a boat in my garage and got it to the point where it was seaworthy. And then started my journey from Michigan to Chicago. And it took about 25 hours nonstop. Which is 65 miles. So was many marathons back-to-back to back. And it was exhausting. So, from that, that caught the attention of another charity and former pro bowler, Charles Peanut Tillman here in Chicago, he played for the bears for many years. And he’s a great guy. His foundation, his daughter had a heart transplant when she was three months old. And he says – he came to one of my fundraisers. We host fundraisers all year long and we have fundraising events and we try to bring as many people to them as possible. And at one of the fundraisers, I was introducing him to a bunch of people. And all these people kept telling him about this road that I had done. And he had never heard of it. He didn’t know anything about it. And at the end of the night, he says, if you ever do it again, I’ll be your wing man and then we’ll do it together. The old top gun saying. So, we spent the next year designing our own boat, building our own boat together. Nights and weekends in our garage. And we did it again. And this time it took a bit longer because the boat was a lot heavier, and everyone said this should go a lot faster. You got two people and you got Charles Tillman. He’s a pro athlete. What people don’t know, and I joke about this and he’s probably going to hit me for this one, but he’s a sprinter. He’s the kind of guy who, the ball is, and I don’t know the expression, I don’t know football that well, but the ball is hiked, I guess, hiked. And he would run as fast as he could from A to B. He’s not a marathon type of guy. And what we were training for was a long-distance marathon. And it was 90% mental. And that’s why he was the right person for it. So, it was a great journey, and every year we had done something, or I had done something like this, and this was the year I did something with him. So, since 2016, through a variety of different fundraising events, whether it’s putting myself out there or hosting in-person cocktail parties and other types fundraising events, I had raised about a million dollars since 2016. And then the pandemic hit and all of that stopped. I wasn’t the only foundation that struggled during the pandemic. I think you talk to anybody in philanthropy or anyone who was a foundation or a charity, the same thing happened. You weren’t able to do in-person events. You weren’t able to do your traditional fundraising initiatives and, myself being in innovation and technology, I just thought there’s got to be a way to solve this problem. And, from that, it was the idea that crypto’s topical. Everyone’s talking out Dogecoin and all these other types of cryptocurrencies and, it might be a new venture. Try to figure out can a token exist that has a purpose of charity and a purpose of philanthropy. So, I went off and developed it, launched it. And it was a success. We were in our V2 contract. The V had some technical challenges that we had to work through. But the second contract has been a great success and we’re just pleased with the result. I think at one point we were generating I think, $10,000 a day for the foundation. And put that in perspective, when I started this, I was hoping to, on an optimistic level, hoping to raise $250-$300 a day. Because that was my commitment to cancer research. So, it was just great to see that it was succeeding and going great. And up to this point, since it launched, which was in September, September’s also childhood cancer awareness month. So, since it launched, we’ve raised about $400,000, that’s gone to direct family support worldwide. As well as paediatric cancer research. And that’s been a worldwide as well. So, we’ve been able to do a significant amount of stuff in a very short period of time and we’re not even done. And we’re just getting started with the potential of what this is going to become.

[Horacio Ruiz]


So that’s awesome. And I kind of want to go a little bit back to what you were talking about. So, number one, you’ve rode Lake Michigan twice. So never, to your research, you’ve never done it before, you did it twice. And then the second thing is the pandemic hits and you’ve got your charity, you’ve raised a million dollars for the charity. Could you give me an idea of how much the fundraising stopped at that point? Like once the pandemic hit.

[Jacob Beckley]

I would say nearly a hundred percent. It was like overnight. And the challenge there is that when the pandemic first really started to hit the US. So, like mid-March of 2020, everything consolidated. If you remember businesses were putting people on furlough. They were cutting all unnecessary expenses, that’s from a business perspective. But when you look at the personal lives of people, the exact same thing happened. People didn’t know what was going to come out of the pandemic. It was a very big time of uncertainty. And the result of that is philanthropy and charitable giving sort of stops. People don’t know what’s going to happen. So, their first thing on their mind, isn’t about giving to others. So it was, it was an overnight thing. And it took about, I would say two or three months of that before the pivot happened. And it’s like, something’s got to change. And when CURE started, I had no idea that there were other types of charity projects that had existed before CURE. I naively thought that it was a novel idea. The reality of it is, is that the crypto space was littered with previous charity projects. And many of them were just pulling at people’s heartstrings and ended up being rug poles, or scams, or other types of honey pots and things. These are words I didn’t know back then as well. So, these are all new terms and new things. But I had no idea, no perspective of that. And I think I came on the heels of a very large project, which was called save the kids. Which ended up being a rug pole, a very large-scale rug pole. So, starting a project in September, right on the heels of that was really difficult. But the community that we got into the project just believed in the idea behind it. They believe in me. I’m a spokesperson, I’m out there all day long on video, trying to talk to people, trying to create partnerships and sponsorships and reaching outside of crypto because this project is resonating probably farther outside of crypto than it is inside of crypto, attracting more people into crypto. And I think the authenticity and the transparency to project is what has enabled us to be successful and still be here at the point where we’re at, when a lot of projects don’t get past the 30-day, 60-day timeframe. And a lot of them start, and then they disappear just as quickly as they started. And we are just getting started. There’s so much happening this year. And something I’d love to talk about a bit here is about the future of CURE and what we’re going to be doing from a technology perspective is just revolutionary. And it’s just branching so far further outside of the crypto space. As we know it today, Ethereum and BSC, and we’re going to go develop our own blockchain right on the rails of an existing blockchain in a way that’s completely revolutionary.

[Horacio Ruiz]

A hundred percent. I kind of want to get down to the fundamentals of CURE token. So, you developed a cryptocurrency, this is a cryptocurrency. It’s not necessarily like a governance token. It’s a currency, and you develop this out of necessity. And now when somebody buys this cure token, right. A percentage of that goes to your foundation and then the rest is, do what you will with it. Right. If you’re able to buy it. You’re able to buy it on, right now Pancake Swap. Is that Correct? 

[Jacob Beckley]

Yes. Pancake swap. And we were just listed on a tier two exchange called L-bank.

[Horacio Ruiz]

L-bank. Okay. And then you also developed a way to buy it using just your standard, easy user experience thing where you could just purchase some of it with a bank deposit or a credit card.

[Jacob Beckley]

It’s actually easier than that. Going back to the roots I described. I work in innovation; I work for some of the biggest brands in the world on innovation. Helping them transform digitally and through a technology standpoint to develop new products and new concepts and bringing them to market. And I applied that to philanthropy, and I applied that to crypto. So as this project got started, I start to see all of these challenges and issues from a user experience perspective, from a technology perspective and all these challenges/opportunities. And one of those was that it was so difficult for people to purchase and acquire our project because it’s on the BSC network. Which here in the US is really difficult to get onto that network and get BNB and all of that. If we were on Ethereum, it might be a different story, but it was extremely difficult. So, I had friends and family and extended friends calling me on a regular basis, saying, how do I get this? What do I got to do? What is a wallet? What is this exchange? What – pan pancake swap, I don’t want to deal with pancake swap and all of these other types of things. And I look at that as, first off, it was time consuming for me to be setting up wallets for people and acquiring BNB, and then swapping it from and then transferring the private keys to them. It was just a cumbersome process. But I looked at it as an opportunity. We needed to create technology that simplified that process and made it easier for people to get into cryptocurrency. And as I said, most people who were coming into cure at this point were people outside of crypto. We were getting friends and families, aunts, and uncles. I mean, just people who knew nothing about the cryptocurrency space. So, we developed a product which is called CURE pay. And CURE pay is an easy on-ramp that you could leverage any payment method. So, this is like your traditional visa, Mastercard, amex discover card. I think even diners, all of them. And it was working through this stripe network, as well as PayPal, you would transact, you would say how many US dollars did you want to spend? It would translate that to tokens. And then the whole backend process kicked in. So, from that point forward, it was an automation tool. It was an automation software platform. We’re not in exchange, we’re not out there holding money. All we’re doing is facilitating a transaction through automation. So, we would transfer BNB in equivalent USD dollar value to a dynamically generated wallet that has secure, private keys stored, that even I can’t get to. And those BNB get transferred there. And into automation as well, we would connect with the pancake swap API and convert those BNB into CURE token. We would then have a dashboard. So, these people would get an email with access to their custom dashboard, where they could see the tokens they purchased, all the transaction history. Then they could do additional features, like request their private keys, and then they would get a QR code, and it would show them their private keys. There was additional features like, obviously buying more, ability to sell, ability to transfer to a wallet of your choice outside of any other tokenomics. So, 0% transfers. And other types of features like staking and stuff like that. Those are things that are there in place today, as well as some things that are on our roadmap for the future. So, this product is the easiest Onramp of all crypto that I’ve ever seen. And I’ve used simplex, and Moon pay early on, Binance and crypto.com and all these others. And it’s difficult to navigate, especially if you don’t know what a wallet is, or you don’t know what an exchange is. And we just wanted to make it feel like you’re buying a pair of shoes online on Amazon, and that’s it. So, we’ve added some more layers to it over time because this space is littered with fraud. There’s a lot of people that are out to scam others, get private keys, take advantage of others, and try to find ways to make a quick buck. So, we’ve added in additional security, layers of security, different measures. So, we’ve added in a KYC process. But I insisted on not putting the KYC process at the beginning of the purchase, but rather at the time you want to request your private keys. Because I don’t want to create a barrier to purchase and acquire cure token, but I want to protect the other holders within CURE pay and within CURE token. So, the KYC is a mandatory process in order to request your private keys, which I think is a reasonable exchange. This is a difficult place to be in if – especially if you have a lot of knowledge or education on this space. And again, just want to protect the current holders, the current people who purchase through cure pay. And that seemed to be the best way to do it. But it’s the easiest onramp, there’s a 5% transaction fee, which is really a processing fee, which covers the credit card processing mechanism through Stripe and PayPal, and the infrastructure it’s required to support this from a technology perspective.

[Horacio Ruiz]

Gotcha. A couple things. So, it seems to me like you’ve really thought out that process. I mean, it seems like you’ve really kind of put a lot of thought into how people – the barriers to buying crypto, and then in doing that, you’ve developed this product that it’s accessible to everybody now. And you’re talking about even being to stake your coins, right. That’s not something that beginners can just do. But if you’re able to do that through CURE pay, and it’s a seamless process, right. That’s pretty awesome. Right.

[Jacob Beckley]

Yeah. And I think the best part of it, I think you’re leading to this, I think, but I think the best part of it is that this is a real utility at the end of the day. Not a lot of projects have this type of on-ramp. They’re only able to tap into people who are educated on what crypto space is and what a wallet is in an exchange and [inaudible 00:19:37] pancake swap all these other terms that just scare people. And we wanted to make it as simple as possible. So, the utility here, it’s built for CURE, it’s built for us to be able to have an on-ramp for people to get to cure. But the future of this utility is to revolutionize the BSC space and Ethereum space by allowing people to adapt this and adopt this into their own projects and white label this solution. So that all the other legitimised legitimate projects out there will be able to license this technology. And not for crazy amounts of fees. And not like you’re paying 80,000 to get not listed on an exchange. I mean, this is just, hey, I want people to use this. I want people to get educated on crypto and learn how to do it and find an easy way into it. And that’s what CURE pays about. And I think that the way we’re looking at a lot of different monetisation strategies, but at the end of the day, we’re not out to make money. That’s not what this is about. We’re out to help the cause to further our mission. So, what we feel is probably the most economical way for other projects to get onboarded is by having a very small managed service fee and potentially even a very small percentage, half a percent or something like that, of every transaction that goes directly into the CURE token liquidity to help build our project and make it more sustainable for the future. 

[Horacio Ruiz]

And then also with that, you said you’ve raised $400,000 since you launched CURE token. What percentage of somebody’s purchase goes towards the foundation?

[Jacob Beckley]


3%? Actually, that was what it was up until a few days ago. We just actually changed our tokenomics. We’ve been decreasing our tokenomics. We started at a 12% total, which is pretty high, but not uncommon for BSC project. And then we put it down to 10% around November, and this week we dropped it to 8%. So, our strategy around to tokenomics is to decrease them over time and probably 1%-2% every few months, to make it more economical for people to enter into the project and exit. Our charity wallet and funds used to be 3%. But as of this week it went to four, and we’ve decreased the other ancillary taxes within the tokenomics this week.

 [Horacio Ruiz]


That’s awesome that you were able to decrease the overall fees while also raising the amount that the foundation gets, which is a win-win right.

 [Jacob Beckley]

I think the reason that that’s possible, and I don’t think a lot of projects can do it, but I think the reason it’s possible is because of my background in tech. I’ve been doing marketing and technology for decades and what our strategy is, is strategy around optimisation. And we’re a very sophisticated project. When it comes to marketing. We have a lot of analytics in place. A lot of tracking. We spend a lot of time in reports and trying to understand what’s worked so that every single dollar that’s spent is an effective use of that dollar. And that’s the same that you have to do when you’re dealing with a foundation. I mean, every dollar matters, it’s so valuable that you want to make sure that that dollar is going to a good purpose and a good use. Our foundation, just to go back to that a second, but when I started the foundation in 2016, I looked at other foundations and I saw a flaw. And the flaw was that foundations, when they get to a certain scale, they are no longer a dollar in dollar out foundation. And I give several examples of this, and I don’t want to throw foundations under the bus, but you can think of some of the biggest, where you give them a dollar of your hard-earned money. And 20% of it actually goes to people in need. That’s a broken system. They get so big that they’re spending so much on marketing and operations and facilities and all of these other things, that they’ve lost sight of the true end goal and the true end mission. And this foundation, when I started, I said, I’m never going to become I’m that kind of foundation ever. I don’t want to give another example, but it’s just something I didn’t want to do. And so early on when I started the foundation, I believed in that so much that my wife and I made a commitment that every dollar in, we would put another 50% on top of that. So, $1.50 out. And we maintained that for three years. And then we went to a dollar in dollar out, and that’s important to me that we don’t get too big of a foundation or too large scale or spend so much money that somebody donates a hundred dollars, and only 20 of it goes out. That’s a broken system. So, we’ve been able to solve that both from the foundation perspective and from CURE token’s perspective, because we’re really smart about how we spend the money and where it goes. And obviously being a foundation, we try everything we can to get businesses and marketers and influencers to really help us out. Because we’re out here to really make a difference at the end of the day. And I believe that the project’s being run well, as well as the foundation. So, this is something the dollar in dollar out that I am never going to lose on the foundation side. It’s so ingrained in what I stand for, and what I’d want the foundation to stand for so far as, we from a foundation perspective, are partnering with other foundations that are like-minded. And the cool thing about this space of supporting causes, especially around children and childhood cancer, is that more times than not the foundations that get started are foundations started from the family. Potentially their child has died from a disease, and they go and start a foundation to keep the memory alive. And they enrol their families and friends and their communities and all of that. Those are the best foundations. Those are the foundations that have a really small footprint, but their reach and their ability to do good is significant. So, we’re trying to partner with those types of foundations and enable them. And through CURE. And try to find who are these foundations. And I know so many of them throughout my years in philanthropy. And try to figure out what we can do to make sure that they are sustainable, that they’re successful, and that they’re going to be here a very long time. One of the facts out there about foundations like these small ones, is that more times than not, they get to about seven years old and then the foundation just sort of stifles away. And that’s because of a variety of different reasons, but more times than not, they just need more support. They need to navigate that seven-year itch that, that gap period. Or these foundations get so large, they go national, and they become really well known. And then they get down to 60% out or 40% out. And then I’m just like, that’s not the way to do it. So, let’s find a way that we can create a network of these small foundations and build a bigger mega foundation. That’s just out there to do good. That’s the only purpose and not out there to make money or pay salaries or anything like that. And that’s something I’m really passionate about. And I believe cure’s going be at the [Inaudible 00:26:02] for that as well.

[Horacio Ruiz]

Everything you’re saying I’m absorbing Jacob. And at the beginning of the podcast, I said there’s so many things to talk about. There truly are. And I kind of want to put CURE token right now, what we’re talking about. So, you’ve developed a cryptocurrency where portion of the purchases go toward your foundation. Okay. And this is a cryptocurrency that can be staked. It can be swapped, there’s a liquidity to pool for it. And it’s there. There’s so much more from there that we can talk about. What I want to do is pause because of what you just said for a minute, could you give me an example or even two of exactly what it is – the impact that you’ve had. Right. And what I mean by that is a specific example of how you’re making a difference in a family’s life or in a child’s life. What are we talking about here?

[Jacob Beckley]

Yeah, I’ve got a lot of examples. We’ve been able to do a lot of grants. And we have a grant application form on our website where anyone can submit a very simple application. I think it’s four or five form fields and request a grant for someone they know, a family or foundation or research. And we’ve received quite a few grants through that. One of these was a boy named Lucas, a four-year-old boy with leukemia. And he’s had leukemia his entire life. And this family has never been able to do anything fun with him. Their lives revolve around cancer, cancer is the word in their household that everything – their whole lives revolve around it. Their conversations, everything they do on a daily basis, just everything. And we wanted to do something different. He had just finished one of his last chemotherapy sessions and was healthy enough that he could travel. And we wanted to give them an opportunity to have a trip of a lifetime. And remember, this this boy had never been on a vacation. I mean, his whole life had been around cancer. So, we went over and above and just tried to figure out what can we do to make this a memorable experience that he’ll never forget. And his family can spend quality time with him and vice versa. So, we paid for an all-expense paid trip, unlimited budget for he and his family to go to Disney world. Which here in the US is a pretty cool thing to do. I mean, that’s a pretty nice vacation. And they just took their trip. I think last week or the week before and they sent us some photos and he had the biggest smile on his face. But what that means for CURE and for me is that we were able to do something for families like that example, that they would never have been able to afford anything like that. I mean their whole life revolves around cancer. And what people don’t understand is when you have a child with cancer, every part of your existence revolves around that child. And it’s a difficult situation for a family to be in. And if we could give them some escape from that for a few days, that’s rewarding. That’s awesome. That’s an example where we’ve just helped the family. But what we do a lot of is direct family support. So, we get a lot of grants with grant applications, with people who can’t pay their mortgage, are getting evicted, losing their car, those types of things because more times than not that’s going to happen to the family. Because they’re spending so much money on care and in-home care and prescriptions and medications and all these things that, unfortunately in the us at least aren’t, aren’t free. You have to pay for these things. And there’s a lot of foundations that help in this scenario. We’re not the only one. But we do help in paying, mortgages, paying rent, we paid rent and mortgages for a number of families all throughout the US and inclusive of the world. We’re doing a charity drop next week in the UK. a month ago, we did some support for hospitals and a family with child with cancer in Africa. We don’t discriminate on region or situation. We just want to do as much good as possible. And one of the things that we’re going to be doing a lot of more recently is that we’re going to involve our community much more in those decision-making process, not discriminating like who should we help, but just how much should we help? So, we’re going to be telling a lot more about the individual cases and get our community really involved in the level of impact that we can provide. So, it’s really remarkable what we’ve been able to do in a short period of time. As I said, we’re just starting, and there’s just so much more on the horizon. Years ago, when I started the foundation, the foundation was focused primarily on paediatric cancer research. Because I believe that, as I said, research with paediatric cancer is going to have cascading effects. That’s where we need to spend money. That’s where we need to find good researchers. And even with CURE, we funded a lot of research all over it. Different hospitals throughout the US and Puerto Rico. But what I’ve thought about recently, and this also is a result of the pandemic, but it’s the research being done well, and is the money going to the right place? And could we be doing better? And I want to talk about that in a bit. But that’s the future of cure. Is how can we enable researchers to be more successful in what they do and be motivated to have faster and more breakthroughs. And I think we’ve kind of cracked that nod and figured it out. And now it’s a matter of building the technology to support it and arming the world with this new technology. 

[Horacio Ruiz]

So what I want to ask is what you mean by that, by having cracked that nut, what insight have you gained from there and what does CURE token, what is its role, right? Because you have a big vision for it. You know it’s mission, but you have this big vision for cure token as really a cryptocurrency for the future of potentially all of healthcare, or a large part of healthcare. And I don’t want to speak for you, but could you share that vision and what is it that you’ve found in – It seems to me trying to be more efficient with your money and with all the systems in place.

 
[Jacob Beckley]

That’s exactly right. So, when CURE started, probably within probably a few weeks of when it came out, it became pretty apparent that CURE stood for something greater than just paediatric cancer, or just CURE token, that the way it was resonating in the communities and when it was spoken about, it was bigger. And I’ll give you an example. One of the things that CURE started to create a movement around was this concept of making healthcare around the world accessible, equal, and affordable. Because everywhere in the world, you don’t have equal healthcare. You don’t always have affordability of healthcare. US is a great example. But you go to other places throughout the world, and it’s not quality healthcare a lot of times. And cure started to resonate as the vehicle to make a change there from the ground up. Almost like decentralising finance, that concept which resonated and took years to do. At first this was a scary place in banks and financial institutions were threatened by cryptocurrency. They were threatened by this concept of decentralised exchange of value. But inevitably they all adopted it. And they all came on board. And now every financial institution and bank in the world deals in cryptocurrency because they need to. Because it was community driven, and community led. The same thing is going to be happening with healthcare. The healthcare system throughout the world is a broken system. It doesn’t matter where you live. You could live someplace where you have free healthcare, you could live where you pay for it doesn’t matter. It’s a broken system. And the only way that system’s going to change is from the ground up from a community driven, decentralised system of healthcare. So, cure started to resonate in the communities as being the vehicle to do that. And we’ve explored that, and we’ve got some ideas of how we can actually initiate change. We’re not going to make the change, but we can help initiate it through the CURE concept. The second thing, and this is the one I’m extremely passionate, about is the future utility of CURE, is what is called the CURE chain. And the CURE chain is another result of the pandemic. And being again in innovation, I think a lot, I mean, my life is about thinking and dissecting problems and analysing and trying to reassemble situations and connecting seemingly invisible dots together throughout my experiences and my journeys. And that’s how CURE came together. But as I was sitting during the pandemic, I stopped and paused and reflected. And I said, how is it that we were able to come out with a vaccine so quickly for this catastrophic ailment that we didn’t know much about, but it happened so quickly. And then it was mainstream even more quickly. And when you break that problem down, you bucket it into a few different categories. I mean, there’s hundreds of different, hundreds and thousands of different reasons and variables that come into play. But when you start to bucket them in to sort of categories, you realise that there were really three primary drivers for that situation to occur. One is that we had an immense amount of accessible data and information. Every country was working together. All research labs stopped working in these silos and pockets throughout the world. And we started to work together, and we were giving people data and we were giving people the a means, at the end of the day, to find the solution. The other variable was that we didn’t know how bad and devastating this was. So, there was a fear aspect and component to this that drove the real time need and desired initiative to make a change. So, these situations of data, accessibility of data, of getting researchers to collaborate, and then having this real incentive and motivator that’s driving the process to occur. That can be bottled up and applied to all different types of diseases. And it should be. Researchers shouldn’t be working on the same research on other parts of the world. We should be more efficient about how research occurs. We should be more efficient on the data that’s getting the accessed. So, the concept that has come to life is this concept for CURE chain, which is a community driven, community led decentralised research vehicle where it’s leveraging the power of NFTs and specifically dynamic NFTs. I mean, sure this whole community does, but everyone here knows what an NFT is, non-fungible token. And the great thing about it is that they’re proof of authority, there’s proof of ownership, there’s accountability. But one of the cool things about it is that it has a reward system based into it. So, the author of an NFT can build into the smart contract that they want to make 10% off of every sale of that NFT in perpetuity. So, it’s this idea that you create this music, and then you license it. And then for the rest of your life, you’re earning in royalties on it. When you look at that and you apply that to this ecosystem of a reward based NFT system blockchain, that becomes pretty valuable, and then you layer on tokenomics to that. It becomes even more valuable. The concept of a crypto currency that has its own tokenomics, but at the same time, every single token is a smart contract that opens up a lot of possibilities to what we can do and how we can leverage that. So, this idea, and it’s actually in development, but this idea is to combine the power of dynamic NFT’s, tie that to personal health information and specifically, I mean all but specifically around rare disease or specifically paediatric cancer. And then have this NFT be tied to an individual anonymously and agnostically. So, there’s no PHI, or personal health information that’s identifiable. Which gets around a lot of regulation. That’s the power to blockchain. And this NFT lives throughout this life cycle. And data gets appended to this. And this could be through a variety of different means. It could be through family participation, health institutions, hospitals, insurance providers, pharmaceutical companies, the whole gamut. Everybody can participate in the creation or the accumulation of content. On the research side, researchers spend a lot of money on a yearly basis, accumulating data. And this is first and second- and third-party data. For first party data they’re doing their own tests. They’re doing medical studies and all those sorts of things. Second party data is usually acquired through their network, of their research network or hospital institution. But third party is hard to get to. And a lot of times it’s not real time or it’s just not considered extremely valuable, but it can be. And this is a vehicle. So, CURE chain is a vehicle to get access to that data. The third component is creating that sense of urgency. And that sense of urgency is created through a variety of different methods. One is by creating the access to the data. There would be a natural incentive for researchers to want to do more with that data. And I’m not saying there’s no data today. There’s a lot of data sources out there today that are accessible, but they’re not on the blockchain. They’re not community driven at all. A hundred percent. And there’s just not enough of it. So, by giving the data, motivating, creating this incentive, which is going to be fuelled by the tokenomics and CURE, is this idea of bounties that are significant and massive rewards, where the researchers now have financial incentive to keep their labs open and keep their research going, almost how they get grants today. But now it’s being fuelled through cryptocurrency and the blockchain and tokenomics, as opposed to people behind a desk and making decisions as a board on who they should fund and who they shouldn’t. There should be a community driven initiative on where funds should go and what research we should enable to occur. 

[Horacio Ruiz]

And hearing you talk about this, and I want to kind of go into a few of those details there, because it seems like it’s a relatively novel concept. I love the idea and I’m kind of following along. But a commentary, right. I don’t know if you remember the bucket challenge with ALS with Lou Gehrig’s disease. And one of the great things about it was that it was, it raised a ton of awareness and a ton of money. But then one of the things that it raised awareness about was exactly how little money had actually went into research up to that point for ALS. Right. And you would think that something that’s like named after an iconic baseball player, Lou Gehrig disease – and something that that’s been kind of out there, like the book Tuesdays with Morrie is based, based on an older gentleman, right, dying of the disease. You would’ve thought that it had more [inaudible 00:40:48] and then when you compare it to other diseases – and I’m not trying to say that one is more important than the other, but you recognise that not everything is researched on the same level, right. Not even close. And then the second thing that I will kind of get into that blockchain is you’re talking about making an NFT with personal health information. So, like we’re talking about maybe anonymously uploading a patient’s health records for the benefit of researchers, right. And having that open to any researcher around the world so they can connect some dots just like they did with COVID 19. 


[Jacob Beckley]

That’s exactly right. Paediatric cancer is what I’m passionate about, but this is not built exclusively for paediatric cancer. I mean, ALS I mean, I have personal connection with ALS as well. And that’s a very devastating disease. And the ice bucket challenge did generate a lot of funds, but even more importantly, a lot of awareness. Which this problem needs, and it’s not exclusive to paediatric cancer or ALS, it’s all a disease and its even rare disease. And there’s really no motivation at the end of the day for – and this is not a great thing for people to talk about, but pharmaceutical companies aren’t out to cure disease. At the end of the day, it’s a business and they need to create sustainability. And they do that by creating treatments. That’s not going to change the world.


Treatments are going to prolong people’s lives. It’s going to generate more revenue, but it’s not going to solve the problem. Cures are going to solve the problem. And I’m not saying cure token or cure chain or any of that’s going to create the cure for cancer or ALS or any of these catastrophic diseases. But I believe it’s going to be the vehicle for others to do it. And that’s what I want to create. And this is coming back to my technology background and my passion and my philanthropy and the charity side, all of its coming together in a way that I feel we’re going to be able to make a difference. And I don’t want to say we’re going to change the world, but I think we’re going to change lives. And we already are changing lives on a small scale, and it’s going to become a much larger scale. One of the saddest facts about research in general, and I’ll talk about paediatric cancer research, because I know a lot about it, but one of the saddest facts is it’s one of the most underfunded research areas within research. The segments. Only 4%, this is well known fact, but only 4% of US government funding goes to paediatric cancer research, that’s insignificant when you think about it. And yet by focusing on paediatric cancer research, it’s going to have cascading effects into lung cancer and colon cancers and other forms of the adulthood cancers that there’s a lot of money that goes to right now. And we really need to shift where the money’s going. We need to push it down to the kids, the ones that by making a difference, their lives are going to be prolonged. And maybe these kids by prolonging in their lives are going to be the ones who create the cure for cancer. You know, so I really believe that we need to focus on the youngest generations and the most aggressive form of cancers. And that’s where we’re going to get the biggest breakthroughs.

[Horacio Ruiz]


Absolutely. And then going into CURE chain, right. You’re basically talking about developing your own blockchain, a brand-new layer one blockchain, meant to kind of be used by the healthcare system.

[Jacob Beckley]


Yeah. That’s the concept, and not exclusively by healthcare. I mean, at the end of the day, that’s where we’re going start, and that’s where we’re focusing. But this incentive based, reward based dynamic, NFT, blockchain built with tokenomics, that whole concept can be applied to other industries. It’s not exclusively healthcare and research. So, it’s a concept where you reward people for access to information. So, it’s a data-based fuel. So, you fuel the blockchain through data and the rewards are paid out passively to the owners of the data. So, this is owning your own personal data, which everybody wants. Everybody needs that. That is something that has to occur. But also, it’s the flip side of that. It’s building in the reward system for researchers so that they can continue what they’re doing and be sustainable. And as well, building in the aspect that this is community driven that now, instead of NIH and CDC and other types of grant-based organisations are making decision where researcher dollars goes, the decisions are going to come out of the communities. And I think that’s one of the most exciting pieces of this. It’s decentralising the concept of research. And again, all this was fuelled by what we all lived through with the pandemic, and for all of our lives and forever more, we’re going to be defined by the pandemic. And I’m just grateful that what I believe to be two great concepts were direct result of one of the most challenging times of our lifetimes. But we’ve got a lot of momentum. We’ve got some great ideas. We’ve got some big-name people behind this initiative. That are – I’m so confident that this is going to become a real thing, we’re going to get there. And we’re going to have this be mainstream. And this is another gap. I mean, in the crypto space, there are not a lot of projects that deal in healthcare or specifically research. Crypto projects that are out there dealing in distribution and currency and proof of all these other sorts of things that are being applied to a variety of different industries as they should be. But healthcare and research is neglected. And I really feel that this could be the catalyst for a big change in healthcare communities. One of the other facts about healthcare, is that it is such a difficult place for innovation to occur, and it stifles innovation. And you could have the smartest people working at a pharmaceutical or healthcare provider company that are coming up with the best ideas, but they’re never going to see the daylight because all the regulation, all the red tape, all the bureaucracy. That’s why this has to come from the ground up. And this decentralised layer one blockchain is just the way to do that and have the community own it at the end of the day. So, it’s not owned by conglomerates that’s just out to monetise data. This is owned by community driven initiative. That’s going to start from the bottom up and with the sole purpose of being the catalyst for change in the world. 


[Horacio Ruiz]

Yeah. And in order for something like that to happen, right. Like you – and you’ve mentioned this before, community driven. And a part of that I would say that one of the big reasons for Bitcoin’s emergence, right, was it had a small passionate community at the beginning. And the early Bitcoiners were so passionate, and I guess convinced about its potential and its future that they couldn’t help but spread the news about it, and what it was and how they intended to use it and change the world. And from there, our community starts emerging. And you’re talking about the same thing using this for research and to incentivise people, get them moving and really move away from this corporate model that the healthcare system has been under for God knows how long. Right. But to that end, and you mentioned this before, you’ve done an amazing job of marketing it. you’ve been out there. You’ve been at the front of AMAs on Twitter. You’ve done different interviews, podcasts. I’ve seen it. One of the big announcements that you did, you just had, is you teamed up. You’re actually a sponsor for a NASCAR team, which I was like, what? That’s a big deal. You got a giant stage. So, you just recently announced a partnership with NASCAR to have cure token on these races. Could you talk about that? 


[Jacob Beckley]

Yeah. You’re right. It is a big deal. I mean, this is a – this is a big deal. I remember watching last year. I don’t know what race it was. It might have been Daytona. Just put this in perspective. I don’t know much about NASCAR. I think my extent of it is days of thunder and someone said it recently, I have to go watch Talladega nights. But I don’t know much about NASCAR. But what I do know is I was, again, last year, I think we were watching the news and I think Dogecoin had a car and I’m like, wow, that’s pretty cool. They went out there, they got a lot of publicity and a lot of awareness about the project. And I felt that CURE needed to do the same. As I had mentioned earlier, our project is resonating much further outside of crypto than it is inside. So, what better place to get more eyeballs on your project than NASCAR? They’ve got so many viewers; the demographic is the crypto demographic from an age perspective. And I’m like, this is what we got to do. So, one of our team members reached out to NASCAR late last year and started conversations. Like, what does this cost and how do you do it? And is it something even for us to be feasible, that we could even do and afford. And we realised that, well, it is possible, this is within the means of the project. So, we agreed to a yearlong media campaign and sponsorship with NASCAR across all our digital media platforms, which is actually starting in a few days here. I think February 2nd. And then, I didn’t know this at the time, but when you deal with NASCAR, you actually are dealing with two or three different entities. One is you with NASCAR as a corporation, which is the marketing engine, the business side of things. But then if you want to sponsor a car, you actually have to sponsor it through a race team. So, I challenged NASCAR to find a race team that our project would resonate with. The philanthropy side, paediatric cancer side, the crypto side, which is actually really difficult to navigate throughout NASCAR today. But they found a race team for us that was the perfect fit. And they found a driver for us through that race team that was absolutely the perfect fit. What resonated the most is that this race team, it’s college racing out of North Carolina. They actually have a foundation of their own, which focuses on childhood, it’s a childhood foundation for all things like family support and I think they even do like building like similar things that we do, build wheelchair ramps and stuff like that. They just help as much as possible to change lives of families that have problems through health-related issues of children. And it was just a really good and solid connection. And then when they told us the driver, who is Noah Gragson, I did some Reese search on him. I’m like, this is the perfect driver. He’s young, he’s 23 years old. He’s raced for six years professionally. He’s been in the Xfinity series, which is the second tier down from the cup series for a few years. And I think he got second place last year overall, or something like – don’t hold me to it. But I think that’s something like that.
But all of this started to resonate. And then they started telling me about his passion for – he loves going to hospitals and meeting with kids and doing what he can to use his public image to make a difference. And I’m like, okay, I got to talk to this guy. So, we connected, and we worked out an agreement that we were going to sponsor, unfortunately we could only sponsor a single race, which we wanted to do it in September, which is childhood cancer awareness month, but we’re going to be doing a lot more than that. So, we’re looking at doing additional races. But as well, we’re doing a lot to build up to the race and make this a really memorable experience. And inclusive of NASCAR has even said, when I pointed out you guys do so much for breast cancer awareness, and I don’t want to diminish breast cancer. I’m just saying they do a lot, you got pink nets or pink wiper blades, whatever they do, they talk about it and all professional sports teams do something. But nobody really does anything for paediatric cancer awareness month. Which is September. Breast cancer awareness month, it’s October. I want to bring light onto paediatric cancer and NASCAR wants too as well. So, year I think they’re going to go above and beyond to really shed a spotlight on paediatric cancer and the challenges there and how we should be putting more energy and attention to it. But our first race is going to be in Kansas City. We’re hoping to do more, but that’s the one we’ve definitely got lined up for us. And as I said, we’re doing a lot of a events leading up to that. We’ve also developed a campaign which is called race for a cure. And race for a cure, you’re going to see it everywhere. We are going with billboards. We are doing mainstream media and interviews. We’re doing charity drops under that campaign. But all of that is tied to CURE token. The concept is cryptocurrency is racing to a cure. And I really believe, and a lot of people think I talk too big or talk too lofty, but I really do believe that that CURE’s going to be the vehicle for real change and real impact. And that’s what excites me the most at the end of the day is that my whole life is led up to this. Everything I’ve done from a professional perspective, everything I’ve done from a philanthropy perspective. The fact that I’ve dedicated my life to a life of service, everything that has happened for a reason.


And it’s all coming together in the form of cryptocurrency and blockchain and inevitably cure. And that’s what I think is just so exciting and rewarding for myself, but also rewarding for the community members. I think they believe in my passion. When I talk, they – I mean, I hope they believe me means I believe it, I really do feel we’re going to make a difference here. And at the end of the day, cryptocurrency is about making money. Every in it for that reason. But it’s great to know that that CURE, I hope will afford people a lot of luxuries and they’ll make money from it. But at the end of the day, it’s about doing good. And that’s what I care about. How much impact can we have in society around the world, not just here in the US, but around the world, and really make a difference in the lives of families who need it, as well as just in just in research in general and just enable it to be more effective and efficient and just be community driven at the end of the day.

[Horacio Ruiz]


So well said. And it’s interesting that what you just said that people maybe think that you have these lofty ambitions for CURE token, and they struggle to see it. Right. One thing that you just said that you’ve dedicated your whole life to this, and you have, I mean, prior to starting this cryptocurrency, you had a successful foundation that was making a difference. You said you had raised a million dollars, like you’re legit, right. Because a lot of times the perception of charity is like, ah, you know, and you talked about this as well, siphoning off funds to make other positions or to do these other things. But you had an established foundation prior to doing that. But could you talk to me about some other, maybe some negative perceptions or some things that you’ve had to kind of work through as you are spreading the message of CURE token? and how do you not convert, but how do you convince people that, hey, I’m here to stay and I really do want to make a difference here?

[Jacob Beckley]

Yeah. This has been a big problem since the beginning. And I’ve countered it as best as I can. And I mentioned early on when I started the project, I was right on the heels of one of the most public rug poles out there in regards to a charity project. And it was difficult. I mean, I got so many people reached out to me say, oh it’s another scam. It’s another charity scam, stay away from this one. And I don’t run away from people who are – they call them FUD, the fear, uncertainty, and doubter, or whatever their term is, people who try to stir up, just panic. I actually go toward it, head on and I try to convince people, you can think what you want to think, but look at what I’ve done. Look at what I’ve accomplished. Look at what cure stands for. This project isn’t going away. This is a project that was designed with one intention, and that intention was to do good. At the end of the day that’s it. And there’s been times throughout the, the past four or five months that we’ve been on a project where there’s been a lot of people who have said, it’s a scam, it’s fraud. And I just show them. I said, look at what we’re doing here. Look at the good we’re doing. Look at what we’re accomplishing. Look at what’s on the horizon. Myself if I was outside of this project looking in, I would look at it as like, this is a great project. They’ve got the right foundation. And that’s what we’ve been building right now. The foundation side of things. The fact that we are in a down market, it’s affecting so many projects, large and small. And we’re looking at this as an opportunity. The opportunity is let’s build more technology. Let’s double down on optimisation. Let’s double down on how we get better at what we do so that when the market picks back up, we’re going to leapfrog in front of all the other projects out there. With the time that we invested into making things stronger. But the concept of legitimacy, from day one I’ve said to everyone around me in the community, this project needs to be about authenticity, and it needs to be about transparency. And I’ve done my best to adhere to those two tenants. There are obviously times when I probably should do more and I can, and I will. But the point is, is that I’m video docs, I’ve done audits, every audit you can imagine, I’ve done the KYC which means nothing at the end of the day. But I’ve done everything. Anything that somebody says you need to do this to prove to me that this is a legitimate project, I’m going to do it. Because I don’t want people to have doubt. Because this is a legitimate project. I’m in this for the right reasons. And infect have bought tokens in the past. But they get burned. I’m not in this to make a dime. My life revolves around the philanthropy side and the charity side. And all I want is to see that succeed. And I want more people to know about the problems and get more awareness about these devastating diseases and that these don’t need to exist. So, I need people to just reach out to me if they got doubts about the project or doubt about what we’re doing. I mean, yeah, I love talking about this stuff. I can talk about it for hours. And I’ll prove day in, day out that we’re a legitimate project with legitimate goals and everything that we have said we were going to do from day one, everything we’ve said, we’ve done it. And it hasn’t been small things. I mean, we’ve done some big, big things. And we’re going to continue to do that this year. We’ve got some extremely lofty goals of what we’re trying to achieve from a market cap perspective, from a community perspective, from a sponsorship and partnership. I mean, everything, every facet. We have a roadmap that is – I mean I look at a lot of projects, that’s my hobby, but I think we have one of the most aggressive roadmaps out there and we’ve broken it up into three categories. One is a technology roadmap. We have a marketing roadmap, and then we have a charity roadmap. And each of these roadmaps have goals in milestones that we’re working toward independently of each other. And we’re at pace to exceed our milestones, which I thought were lofty last year. I was like, there’s no way we’re going to do that. But we’re already doing it. And from a marketing perspective, I never thought we would be on a NASCAR. I never thought we would go mainstream to that degree, but we’ve done it. And from a charity perspective, I would’ve been happy, as I said, making $250 or $300 a day to help families and research. And we far exceeded that and we’re going to far exceed that by the end of this year. And it just seems like every goal that we set, it’s conservative goal. At the same time, it’s looked at as a lofty goal. But we’ve been exceeding every single benchmark that we throw out there.

[Horacio Ruiz]

Without a doubt. And Jacob, thank you for, for sharing everything, man. I mean, the way you’ve laid it out and the way that you’ve thought it out and been an advocate, right. For paediatric cancer patients. I mean, that is something that – I’m a father of three. I can only imagine the horror, right, of getting some news like that. And so, your hands down, just a lot of, on my end, appreciation for the work that you do. There are people listening, where can they learn more about CURE token? How can they contact you and what are the, maybe the better social media spots that you’re on where people can comment or look you up? 

[Jacob Beckley]

No, that’s great question. I mean the easiest place to go to is curetoken.com. We also have raceforacuredot com. That’s the campaign we’re running for NASCAR. But also, if people want to reach out to me, they can go to my LinkedIn. I also have my personal email in our solidity contract. I even think my cell phone numbers in there. In the comments. I am probably one of the most accessible people within crypto. I am on telegram, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, every single social media channel. And although I get a lot of responses or requests all day, I do reach back out to people. And I don’t think there’s any of any outstanding messages I haven’t responded to. So, I do personally respond. But I am extremely accessible, and I love talking about this stuff, and it doesn’t even need to be just about paediatric cancer or the foundation or CURE token. I’ve become a mentor and a guide to other people who want to start projects and to other people who are just curious about cryptocurrencies. And I just want more people to know about the foundation, know about the problem, but I also just want people to learn about crypto. I think it’s a really important thing that is something that everybody’s going to need to learn about. And I want to help do that. I want to be a piece of that education. So, if anyone does have any questions, obviously come to curetoken.com first. But from there you’ll branch out to all the social media channels. 

[Horacio Ruiz]

Awesome, man. Yeah. And I got to mention, I had a big question I want to ask you. Like innovation, you’re in the innovation space and to me, it’s like, that’s awesome. And I’m like, what does that exactly entail? And I mean that in the best way. When you’re solving these difficult problems, I could see somebody wanting to reach out to you and getting your mentorship, your guidance for different things. So, Jacob, thank you so much. Is there anything else that maybe we didn’t touch on today that you’d like to like to add on? Anything before we say goodbye?

[Jacob Beckley]


Well, honestly, I think this was a great and really well thought through questions. I’m just pleased with being able to cover off on a lot of the foundation side of things. Because that’s what I’m most passionate about. I mean, obviously cryptocurrencies why people are here. And at the end of the day that’s where went. But the foundation is what matters the most to me. I just really want to see that succeed and help as many people as possible. So no, I don’t have anything. I mean, you’ve covered off on so much. I’m just grateful to have this opportunity to be able to share my mission, my calling in life. And I’m just happy as well that it came through the form of technology and cryptocurrency and blockchain. That’s throughout my career, everything’s sort of pointed to that direction. And today we’re focusing so much on NFTs, for example, in my mainstream job through innovation. And it’s just exciting that everything’s like tying together and I feel like my life has come full circle with every experience I’ve had throughout my life is just taking me to this point and taken CURE to this point, to be one of the most successful projects out there. I really believe we’re going to be up there for many years to come. 

[Horacio Ruiz]


Absolutely. Thanks for joining us, man. I really wish you the best. And I’m looking forward to seeing that car running around in, in Kansas City. That’s going to be awesome seeing that CURE token car going around and having that sponsorship go through. And I hope that when the time comes that you’re not too busy and then we can have you back in maybe six months or a year, and kind of catch up and see how you’re doing then. And I’m sure you’re going to be full of more news and a bunch of updates.

 [Jacob Beckley]

Absolutely. I’ll be more than happy to come back at any point. And thank you so much for the thoughtful questions. I mean, it means a lot. And usually, I get a lot of questions that aren’t really well thought through. So, this was really great.

 [Horacio Ruiz]

The fact that Jacob is sponsoring a stock car on the NASCAR circuit is a Testament to his will and desire to see CURE token succeed. In speaking to him, I can unapologetically say that I believe in him and that he will have a profound impact on paediatric cancer research. I think that’s something we could all get behind. And I’m looking for forward to seeing where the Beckley foundation and CURE token is six months from now. An eternity in the crypto landscape. If you enjoyed today’s podcast, let others know about it. We find our guests so interesting and knowledgeable, and I know others will too. Or leave a review or hit the follow button until the next episode, take care.

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Author

Horacio Ruiz

Horacio Ruiz

Horacio is a veteran math teacher of the New York City public school system. Prior to teaching, he lived in New Orleans where he worked in sales for the New Orleans Hornets before joining The Institute for Sport and Social Justice to rebuild homes in the Lower Ninth Ward and neighboring St. Bernard Parish. He currently lives in Staten Island with his wife, Alicia, his three sons; Oliver, Henry, and Jacob, and their pitt-mi,x Tipitina. In 2019, Horacio published a biography, The White Knight: Calvin Patterson and the Integration of Florida State University Football.

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